human beings – Aaim Austin http://aaimaustin.org/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 10:52:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://aaimaustin.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png human beings – Aaim Austin http://aaimaustin.org/ 32 32 progressive fundamentalism | Eric Scot English https://aaimaustin.org/progressive-fundamentalism-eric-scot-english/ https://aaimaustin.org/progressive-fundamentalism-eric-scot-english/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 00:32:58 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/progressive-fundamentalism-eric-scot-english/ [ad_1] Trip warning: it will piss off some! Disclaimer:By “evangelical” I am referring to anyone who believes they are evangelical.By “progressive” I mean anyone who thinks they are progressive.By “fundamentalist” I am referring to anyone to whom this position applies. Give sense… Good! With all of those qualifications out of the way, let’s get started. […]]]>


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Trip warning: it will piss off some!

Disclaimer:
By “evangelical” I am referring to anyone who believes they are evangelical.
By “progressive” I mean anyone who thinks they are progressive.
By “fundamentalist” I am referring to anyone to whom this position applies.

Give sense…

Good!

With all of those qualifications out of the way, let’s get started.

Recently I had conversations that reminded me that fundamentalism comes in all shapes and sizes. I spend a lot of time criticizing evangelism and the fundamentalism that often accompanies it. It is only fair that progressive fundamentalists are held to the same level as conservatives. In fact, I hope that progressives one day will not be known for their fundamentalism, but for their intellectual and social capacities.

You may be wondering what fundamentalism looks like in a progressive world. Well… that sounds almost exactly like what he does for the Conservatives. It is intolerant. He does not approve of reasonable questions. He does not allow himself to be examined and challenged. It forces its followers to adhere to strict criteria of irreducible beliefs that any deviation is considered treason. There are probably other criteria that could be mentioned, but for now that will do.

For some reason, when people feel threatened, they often move from the middle to the polar regions of the political-religious spectrum. I believe the reason so many evangelicals are fundamentalists these days is that they feel threatened. There is security in the extremes because for many there is a familiarity and connection with this position that they do not want to lose. It takes work to maintain some form of common ground.

The same is true of progressives. When they feel threatened, they too move towards their extreme polar. There is no doubt that issues of race and sexuality are two of those burning issues that quickly push some to the limit. Hopefully, this article can help ease that move to the edge by challenging progressives to think twice before reacting to those who might disagree with them.

The bottom line is that we need to be able to have conversations about these issues. We must have a rigorous debate, and we must do so in a spirit of love, learning and reform. If we are unable to do so, then very little, if anything, separates us from those we criticize.

I recognize that many of the issues progressives care deeply about are social in nature, which means that the ideas they champion have victims; they have human beings who have been deeply affected by something. Without doubt, this has merit. This is definitely one of the reasons I am a progressive Christian. However, if we truly believe our behavior is in line with Jesus Christ, then we must also show the same love and compassion to others as Him, even those with whom we disagree. Think of those with whom we disagree as those most in need of the love of Christ.

I think we have a problem with being too intolerant. As progressives, we support our counterparts that they need to be more tolerant and yet we often have very little patience for those with questions, especially if they question our core beliefs. You can forget that people who are by nature critical thinkers have to ask themselves questions – that’s how they learn. For example, we need to recognize that the mere fact that a person has a question about being non-binary is not in itself a statement of disagreement. But often that’s how we treat people when they have questions.

Perhaps one of the most important problems with progressive Christianity is that we have to be careful about the words we choose to use. For example, not everyone who disagrees with a progressive view of “filling in the blank” is not phobic or hateful. Progressives must learn to engage with people who disagree with them so that, at the very least, the other person can understand our views – even if in the end they always disagree. At least they have the right information.

The purpose of this article is not to condemn, but to draw attention to some of the problems that exist in our own ranks. I think we need to be more humble and understand that we have work to do. It is by doing this work that we hope to make progressive fundamentalism a thing of the past. We should exercise the same fervor to eradicate fundamentalism within progressive Christianity as we do in other forms of fundamentalism.

You can see my UNenlightenment YouTube channel HERE
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Pope calls on all religions to “defuse the temptation of fundamentalism” https://aaimaustin.org/pope-calls-on-all-religions-to-defuse-the-temptation-of-fundamentalism/ https://aaimaustin.org/pope-calls-on-all-religions-to-defuse-the-temptation-of-fundamentalism/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 15:17:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/pope-calls-on-all-religions-to-defuse-the-temptation-of-fundamentalism/ [ad_1] Pope Francis urged all the peoples of the world to put aside “partisan games” and all hostilities and to regard others as “like human beings” and “brothers and sisters in the faith”. The Pope made this appeal Thursday at the Roman Colosseum during the closing ceremony of the Meeting of Religious for Peace, an […]]]>


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Pope Francis urged all the peoples of the world to put aside “partisan games” and all hostilities and to regard others as “like human beings” and “brothers and sisters in the faith”.

The Pope made this appeal Thursday at the Roman Colosseum during the closing ceremony of the Meeting of Religious for Peace, an annual event organized by the Sant’Egidio community.

“In the name of peace, please, in every religious tradition, let us defuse the temptation of fundamentalism and any tendency to consider a brother or sister as an enemy”, pleaded the Pope, speaking on a platform installed at the foot of the most emblematic monument.

“The suffering of others hardly disturbs us”

“If there are those who are plagued by hostility, factions and partisan games, we ourselves repeat Imam Ali’s words: ‘There are two types of people: your brothers and sisters in faith, and those who are like you. ‘ “, continued François, standing alongside the religious leaders.

They included the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, Bartholomew I, and the Grand Imam of Al Azhar, Ahmed Al-Tayyeb. Outgoing German Chancellor Angela Merkel was also present.

“People as brothers and sisters. We proclaim it in the context of the Colosseum,” the Pope continued.

“Long ago, this amphitheater was the site of brutal mass entertainment,” he noted.

“Today, we too can be spectators of violence and war, of brothers killing brothers, like games that we watch from afar, indifferent, certain that they will never affect us,” lamented François.

“The suffering of others does not trouble us much. Not even the suffering of war victims, migrants, young boys and girls trapped in conflict,” he said.

The arms trade

The 84-year-old Pope also renewed his condemnation of the arms trade.

“War plays with human lives. Violence and the scourge of a booming arms trade, often moving in the shadows, fueled by underground cash flows,” he thundered.

Further on, the Pope spoke out against violence that also extends to the environment. He even quoted Bartholomew I, whose efforts to defend the environment have earned him the title of “Green Patriarch”.

At the end of the ceremony, the Pope and the other religious leaders signed a “call for peace”.

Their main message is that “religions can build peace and educate it”.

“Only peace is holy, and no one should ever use the name of God to bless terror and violence… People long for peace,” says the call.

“The disarmament process, currently blocked, must be relaunched,” he insisted.

The signatories also warn that “the proliferation of nuclear weapons is an incredible threat.”

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All religious traditions must resist the ‘temptation of fundamentalism’ | Catholic National Register https://aaimaustin.org/all-religious-traditions-must-resist-the-temptation-of-fundamentalism-catholic-national-register/ https://aaimaustin.org/all-religious-traditions-must-resist-the-temptation-of-fundamentalism-catholic-national-register/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 18:42:15 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/all-religious-traditions-must-resist-the-temptation-of-fundamentalism-catholic-national-register/ [ad_1] VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis called on leaders of world religions to resist “the temptation of fundamentalism” in the name of peace at an interfaith rally on Thursday outside the Colosseum. Peace “calls us to serve the truth and to declare what is wrong when it is wrong, without fear or pretense, even and […]]]>


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VATICAN CITY – Pope Francis called on leaders of world religions to resist “the temptation of fundamentalism” in the name of peace at an interfaith rally on Thursday outside the Colosseum.

Peace “calls us to serve the truth and to declare what is wrong when it is wrong, without fear or pretense, even and especially when it is committed by those who profess to follow the same creed as us,” said the Pope on October 7.

Vatican Media.

“For peace, please, in every religious tradition, let us defuse the temptation of fundamentalism and any tendency to regard a brother or sister as an enemy.

Speaking on a stage with Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist and Hindu representatives, Pope Francis called for peace amid current conflicts around the world.

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

“Dear brothers and sisters, as believers it is our responsibility to help eradicate hatred from human hearts and to condemn all forms of violence. Let us unambiguously urge that weapons be put aside and military spending reduced, in order to meet humanitarian needs, and that the instruments of death be transformed into instruments of life, ”commented the Pope.

“Fewer weapons and more food, less hypocrisy and more transparency, more vaccines distributed fairly and fewer weapons traded indiscriminately,” he said.

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

The Pope called prayer a source of strength that “disarms hearts filled with hatred”.

Ahmed el-Tayeb, the grand imam of al-Azhar in Cairo, Egypt, also spoke.

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

The Islamic scholar, who signed the landmark document on human brotherhood with Pope Francis in 2019, criticized the uneven distribution of COVID-19 vaccines around the world.

He said that “the world has suffered a setback despite the efforts of religious institutions, their representatives and leaders, to foster a collaborative approach and the exchange of goods, prioritizing public interest over private interests.”

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

Pope Francis was speaking at the closing ceremony live on “People as Brothers, Future Earth.” Religions and cultures in dialogue ”, the 35th event promoted by the Sant’Egidio community in the“ spirit of Assisi ”, the interfaith gathering convened in the birthplace of Saint Francis by Pope John Paul II in 1986.

In his speech, the Pope said: “Today, in a globalized society which sensationalizes suffering, but remains unable to sympathize with it, we must ‘build compassion’… We must listen to others, make their suffering our own, and look at their faces.

“We cannot continue to accept wars with the detachment with which we watch the evening news, but rather make an effort to see them through the eyes of the peoples involved,” he said.

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

Christian leaders present at the event included Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople, spiritual leader of the world’s 300 million Orthodox Christians, Karekin II, leader of the Armenian Apostolic Church, and German Lutheran Bishop Heinrich Bedford-Strohm. The event began with a prayer involving Christian leaders.

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

Representatives of the world’s religions at the ceremony included Rabbi Pinchas Goldschmidt, Chief Rabbi of Moscow and Chairman of the Conference of European Rabbis, Shoten Minegishi, a Soto Zen Buddhist monk from Japan, Sayyed Abu al-Qasim al-Dibaji, from Pan -Islamic Jurisprudence Organization world, and Edith Bruck, Jewish writer of Hungarian origin and Holocaust survivor.

Lakshmi Vyas, President of the Hindu Forum of Europe, and Jaswant Singh, a Sikh representative, were also present.

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

“As representatives of different religious traditions, we are all called to resist the lure of worldly power, to be the voice of the voiceless, the support of the suffering, advocates of the oppressed and victims of hatred, of the people rejected by both men and women. on earth, yet precious in the eyes of the One who dwells in the heavens ”, declared the Pope.

Pope Francis said there was a connection between the “dream of peace” and the need to take care of creation.

“By cultivating a contemplative and non-predatory approach, religions are called to listen to the moans of mother earth, which is undergoing violence,” he said.

The Pope suggested that “unbridled individualism and the desire for self-sufficiency” had spilled over into “insatiable greed”.

“The land we inhabit bears the scars, while the air we breathe is rich in toxins but poor in solidarity. We have thus poured the pollution of our hearts on creation, ”he declared.

Vatican Media.

Vatican Media.

At the rally, Sabera Ahmadi, a young woman recently arrived from Afghanistan, read a call for peace.

“The pandemic has shown how human beings are in the same boat, linked by deep threads. The future does not belong to those who waste and exploit, to those who live for themselves and ignore others, ”she said.

“The future belongs to united women and men and to fraternal peoples. May God help us to rebuild the common human family and to respect mother earth. In front of the Colosseum, symbol of greatness but also of suffering, let us reaffirm with the strength of faith that the name of God is peace.

Angela Merkel also spoke at the event, which is due to step down as German Chancellor following the federal elections on September 26. She had a private audience with the Pope on the morning of October 7.

The 67-year-old, who has led the most populous nation in the European Union since 2005, has been a frequent visitor to the Vatican since Pope Francis was elected in 2013.

The Pope described the Lutheran pastor’s daughter as “one of the great figures in world politics” in an interview last month. He has received Merkel in private audience more often than any other head of state.

Pope Francis greets Angela Merkel, the outgoing German Chancellor, at the Vatican, October 7, 2021. Vatican media.

Pope Francis greets Angela Merkel, the outgoing German Chancellor, at the Vatican, October 7, 2021. Vatican media.

The two leaders spoke privately for about 45 minutes before exchanging gifts. The Pope gave Merkel a small bronze image of the holy door in St. Peter’s Basilica along with copies of her writings. She gave him three volumes on the Bible and a book on Michelangelo.

In what should be her farewell visit as Chancellor, Merkel also met Vatican Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin and “Foreign Minister” Archbishop Paul Gallagher.

Pope Francis greets Angela Merkel after the closing ceremony.  Vatican Media.

Pope Francis greets Angela Merkel after the closing ceremony. Vatican Media.

The Holy See press office declared that “during the cordial discussions, thanks were expressed for the existing good bilateral relations and the fruitful collaboration between the Holy See and Germany”.

He added: “The parties then turned their attention to issues of mutual interest in the international and regional spheres, agreeing on the opportunity to relaunch cooperation to deal with the multiple ongoing crises, with particular reference the consequences of the health emergency and migration.

In his speech outside the Colosseum, Pope Francis said: “Yes, let’s dream of religions as sisters and of peoples as brothers! Sister religions to help peoples to be brothers and sisters living in peace, reconciled stewards of creation, our common home.

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What would extraterrestrials mean for traditional religious belief? https://aaimaustin.org/what-would-extraterrestrials-mean-for-traditional-religious-belief/ https://aaimaustin.org/what-would-extraterrestrials-mean-for-traditional-religious-belief/#respond Thu, 02 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/what-would-extraterrestrials-mean-for-traditional-religious-belief/ [ad_1] Religion Unplugged believes in a well-reasoned and well-researched diversity of opinions. This article reflects the views of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Religion Unplugged, its staff, and its contributors. (OPINION) The first episode of the “Ancient Aliens” cable TV series promised to show that the growth of intelligent life on […]]]>


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Religion Unplugged believes in a well-reasoned and well-researched diversity of opinions. This article reflects the views of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Religion Unplugged, its staff, and its contributors.

(OPINION) The first episode of the “Ancient Aliens” cable TV series promised to show that the growth of intelligent life on this planet has benefited from the help of the stars.

The show’s summary, produced by Prometheus Entertainment, in 2010 asked, “If ancient aliens visited Earth, what was their legacy and did they leave clues?”

The bigger question, nearly 200 episodes later, is whether aliens provided the building blocks of life itself. This is the kind of subject – both theological and scientific – that surfaces whenever there is debate about the existence of extraterrestrial life.

It was one thing for a recent U.S. National Intelligence report to discuss incomplete technical data and the possibility of hostile spy drones. It was another thing to say that experts had no scientific explanation for the more than 140 reported “unidentified aerial phenomena”.

The summary noted that 18 mysterious objects “appeared to hover in high winds, move upwind, maneuver abruptly, or move at considerable speed, with no discernible means of propulsion.”

This raised questions familiar to those who have followed decades, if not centuries, of debates about these mysteries: Who created these objects? Who created the beings who created them? Should religious leaders on this planet be worried?

“The logic is that many people assume that life is special, that human beings have one purpose and are created in the image of God, and that this life – life made in the image of God – cannot exist. nowhere else, “said Stephen C. Meyer, who has a doctorate in philosophy of science from the University of Cambridge. He is known to have written controversial books, such as “Signature in the Cell: DNA and the Evidence for Intelligent Design” and the recent “Return of the God Hypothesis”.

Many experts seem to think that Christianity has explicit doctrines on this matter, he added, but “this is not a solid judgment because there is no explicit Christian teaching on the subject – unless we now regard CS Lewis as canonical “.


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The Oxford scholar and Christian apologist wrote a space trilogy, beginning in 1938 with “Out of the Silent Planet”, focusing on contact between humans and intelligent beings on other planets. In an essay titled “Will We Lose God in Outer Space,” he hypothesized that the distance between Earth and the rest of the universe served as “God’s quarantine precautions”.

Shortly before his death in 1963, Lewis told a reporter: “I look in horror to come into contact with the other inhabited planets, if there are any. We would only be transporting all our sins and acquisition spirit to them and establishing a new colonialism. I can’t bear to think about it.

Pope Francis has brushed aside similar questions about aliens. In 2015, he told the news magazine Paris Match: “I think we have to stick to what scientists tell us, always aware that the Creator is infinitely greater than our knowledge.

But discussions of extraterrestrial life raise the same creation questions that spark fierce disputes on Earth.

For example, some scientists have speculated that aliens may be linked to life on earth. In a 1973 article, Francis Crick, co-discoverer of the structure of DNA, and biochemist Leslie Orgel noted that life may have been “deliberately passed on … by intelligent beings on another planet.” We conclude that it is possible that life reached earth this way, but there is currently insufficient scientific evidence to say anything about the likelihood.

This would raise another ultimate question, according to evolutionist Richard Dawkins of Oxford, a popular critic of creationism and intelligent design. During a debate on intelligent design, he wrote that “even though our species had been created by alien designers, those designers themselves should have come from simpler backgrounds – so they cannot be one. ultimate explanation for anything “.

That’s a valid point, said Meyer, reached by phone. But those who believe in a random, unguided, creation process for the universe and for life would still need to demonstrate how the conditions existed for this to happen on other planets. Meanwhile, “a theistic God could have created life anywhere.”

“Not finding ET could be a blow to naturalists more than finding ET would be a blow to theists,” he said. Substituting aliens for a creator’s work would not “just kick that can on the road, it would send him back into space.”

Terry Mattingly writes this weekly column “On Religion” for the Universal union. Republished with permission from the author.

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CM condemns the rise of religious fundamentalism https://aaimaustin.org/cm-condemns-the-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism/ https://aaimaustin.org/cm-condemns-the-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 14:38:15 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/cm-condemns-the-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism/ [ad_1] Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said on Monday that the powerful stream of humanism that animated the teachings of 19th-century social reformer Sree Narayana Guru was a panacea for the world torn by communal and racial strife. Inaugurating the Renaissance leader’s birth anniversary celebrations by videoconference from Kannur, Mr. Vijayan took the opportunity to condemn […]]]>


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Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said on Monday that the powerful stream of humanism that animated the teachings of 19th-century social reformer Sree Narayana Guru was a panacea for the world torn by communal and racial strife.

Inaugurating the Renaissance leader’s birth anniversary celebrations by videoconference from Kannur, Mr. Vijayan took the opportunity to condemn the rise of religious fundamentalism in Afghanistan.

He said Afghanistan was an example of what would happen to a nation consumed by religious fundamentalism. “Fundamentalism is a destructive fire that destroys civilizations and nations,” he said.

Only humanism could extinguish such destructive conflagrations. The Guru’s teachings rooted in compassion, universal peace, human rights and tolerance have provided answers to the woes of the world.

Mr. Vijayan recalled the plight of the oppressed people of Palestine and the ethnic cleansing of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. He said communal hatred often appears in India.

“There has never been a time in history when religious fundamentalism has limited the rights of human beings on such a global scale,” he said.

The Guru had emphasized the essential unity of humans regardless of race, culture, caste, creed, religion, gender or skin color. “One caste, one religion, one God for humans” was Sree Narayana Guru’s belief system.

The LDF government had honored the reformer’s credo with progressive action. He had defeated the powerful caste forces in the feudal society of Kerala in the 19th century by spreading reason, education, enlightenment and pacifist thought.

Mr. Vijayan said the reformer recognized caste as a convenient instrument for social and financial oppression. He fought it with an emphasis on Renaissance values. He gathered a social conscience against child marriage, polygamy, animal sacrifice and other social evils of his time.

Mr. Vijayan said the Guru was above castes and religion. His teachings were universal in nature. They have had a beneficial effect on all strata of society. Mr Vijayan said it was historically inaccurate to portray the reformer as the leader of a particular caste. The seer had used religious thought as a tool to emancipate the masses.

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Afghanistan is a lesson in how religious fundamentalism can burn nations, says Kerala CM https://aaimaustin.org/afghanistan-is-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-says-kerala-cm/ https://aaimaustin.org/afghanistan-is-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-says-kerala-cm/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/afghanistan-is-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-says-kerala-cm/ [ad_1] On Monday, Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said the current situation in Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity on how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn nations. Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said the current situation in Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity on how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can […]]]>


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On Monday, Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said the current situation in Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity on how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn nations.

Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said the current situation in Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity on how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn nations. (Photo: file)

Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said on Monday that the current situation in Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity in how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn nations. He was speaking at a virtual event to commemorate the 167th anniversary of the birth of spiritual leader and social reformer Sree Narayana Guru.

“Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity – a lesson in how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn people and nations,” Vijayan said during his speech.

He said that “racism, bigotry and bloodshed were endemic” in many parts of the world and that the situation in Afghanistan was particularly dire.

“THE ULTIMATE HEALING IS UNITY”

Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan then gave examples of religious fundamentalism around the world and in India. He said the situation in Palestine and Kashmir as well as the case of Rohingya refugees were all examples of the same.

Pinarayi Vijayan said that it was possible to end communal hatred in India by adopting Sree Narayana Guru’s message that all human beings should be treated as one and not discriminated against on the basis of caste or religion.

“The ultimate remedy for such social evils is the Guru’s message of unity on behalf of humanity beyond caste and religion,” he said.

Earlier Monday, Kerala CM Pinarayi Vijayan took to social media to post a tribute to Sree Narayana Guru. He wrote: “It is time to stand united to overcome the challenges posed by communal, political and capitalist ideologies that undermine brotherhood and equality. Only then can the current crisis be resolved and a new world full of peace and prosperity can be established.

Meanwhile, the Governor of Kerala, Arif Mohammed Khan, said in his message on the occasion: “My humble pranams to Sree Narayana Guru for his 167th Jayanti. With our feet steadfast on the noble principles advocated by this Vishwa Guru, let purity permeate our thoughts, words and deeds. “

(With PTI entries)

READ ALSO: Why Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan denies the existence of IS sleeper cells in Kerala
READ ALSO: Taliban warn of “consequences” if August 31 deadline for withdrawal of US troops is extended

Click here for IndiaToday.in’s full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic.


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Pinarayi Vijayan: Afghanistan, a lesson in how religious fundamentalism can burn nations : Kerala CM https://aaimaustin.org/pinarayi-vijayan-afghanistan-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-kerala-cm/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/pinarayi-vijayan-afghanistan-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-kerala-cm/ Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity that communal discord in the name of religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations and therefore we must hold humanity above caste and religion, said Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday. Speaking at the virtual inauguration of the 167th birth anniversary of spiritual leader and social reformer Sree […]]]>
Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity that communal discord in the name of religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations and therefore we must hold humanity above caste and religion, said Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday. Speaking at the virtual inauguration of the 167th birth anniversary of spiritual leader and social reformer Sree Narayana Guru, the Chief Minister said in many parts of the world that “racism, bigotry and bloodshed were endemic” and that the situation was extremely serious in Afghanistan, one of India’s neighbours.

In India too, communal hatred has arisen and all of this can be ended by embracing Guru’s message that all human beings should be treated as one and not discriminated against on the basis of caste or religion.

“Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity. A lesson in how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations,” Vijayan said in his speech.

He said what was happening in Palestine, in the case of the Rohingya refugees and in Kashmir were examples of divisive religious fundamentalism.

“The ultimate cure for such social ills is the guru’s message of unity on behalf of humanity beyond caste and religion,” he added.

Earlier today, in a Facebook post on the occasion of the guru’s 167th birthday, Vijayan said, “It is time to stand united to overcome the challenges posed by communal, political and capitalist ideologies that are undermining the fraternity and equality. may the present crisis be resolved and a new world full of peace and prosperity be established.”

He said Sree Narayana Guru’s messages proclaiming humanity rather than caste and religion should be sincerely understood and followed in present times “more than ever” for the “betterment” of society.

In his message, Governor of Kerala, Arif Mohammed Khan said, “My humble pranams to #SreeNarayanaGuru on his 167th Jayanti. With our feet firm on the noble principles advocated by this Vishwa Guru, let purity permeate our thoughts, words and deeds. ”

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Afghanistan, a lesson in how religious fundamentalism can burn nations: Kerala CM https://aaimaustin.org/afghanistan-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-kerala-cm/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/afghanistan-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-kerala-cm/ Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity that communal discord in the name of religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations and therefore we must hold humanity above caste and religion, said Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday. Speaking at the virtual inauguration of the 167th birth anniversary of spiritual leader and social reformer Sree […]]]>

Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity that communal discord in the name of religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations and therefore we must hold humanity above caste and religion, said Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday. Speaking at the virtual inauguration of the 167th birth anniversary of spiritual leader and social reformer Sree Narayana Guru, the Chief Minister said in many parts of the world that “racism, bigotry and bloodshed were endemic” and that the situation was extremely serious in Afghanistan, one of India’s neighbours.

In India too, communal hatred has arisen and all of this can be ended by embracing Guru’s message that all human beings should be treated as one and not discriminated against on the basis of caste or religion. “Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity. A lesson in how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations,” Vijayan said in his speech.

He said what was happening in Palestine, in the case of the Rohingya refugees and in Kashmir were examples of divisive religious fundamentalism. “The ultimate cure for such social ills is the guru’s message of unity on behalf of humanity beyond caste and religion,” he added.

Earlier today, in a Facebook post on the occasion of the guru’s 167th birthday, Vijayan said, “It is time to stand united to overcome the challenges posed by communal, political and capitalist ideologies that are undermining the fraternity and equality. may the current crisis be resolved and a new world full of peace and prosperity be established.” He said that the messages of Sree Narayana Guru proclaiming humanity rather than caste and religion should be understood and followed sincerely at the current era “more than ever” for the “improvement” of society.

In his message, Governor of Kerala, Arif Mohammed Khan said, “My humble pranams to #SreeNarayanaGuru on his 167th Jayanti. With our feet firm on the noble principles advocated by this Vishwa Guru, let purity permeate our thoughts, words and deeds. “

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The Crux of Religious Belief: “A Song for Leibowitz” by Walter Miller Jr. https://aaimaustin.org/the-crux-of-religious-belief-a-song-for-leibowitz-by-walter-miller-jr/ https://aaimaustin.org/the-crux-of-religious-belief-a-song-for-leibowitz-by-walter-miller-jr/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/the-crux-of-religious-belief-a-song-for-leibowitz-by-walter-miller-jr/ [ad_1] I love the poet, and I love Benjamin (Eleazar). The rest you can have them. Father Paulo is the most attentive of the abbots. Rachel is frightening, both a two-headed reminder of the biblical Rachel who weeps over her children (Mt 2, 18) and an allusion to the ship that saves Ishmael in the […]]]>


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I love the poet, and I love Benjamin (Eleazar). The rest you can have them.

Father Paulo is the most attentive of the abbots. Rachel is frightening, both a two-headed reminder of the biblical Rachel who weeps over her children (Mt 2, 18) and an allusion to the ship that saves Ishmael in the epilogue of Moby-dick. Brother François is gentle and worthy of respect for clinging to honest experience and uncertainty in the face of violent authority. Father Zerchi is just as brutal as Father Arkos. The rest of them, the rest of the characters from the Walter M. Miller Jr. classic, A hymn for Leibowitz, you can have.

Like the Poet, therefore, I must here engage in apologetics, that is to say by employing the ironic meaning that the Poet offers in the middle of a banquet in “Fiat Lux”, the second part of the novel. . I apologize for myself. I’m sorry, but I don’t like science fiction. So maybe a fruitful way to start a discussion about this novel is for me to admit that I don’t really like it.

I find it clever and funny in places, but that’s it. I find that science fiction prompts the reader, in the middle of reading about an exotic world or universe, to say, “Oh, it’s me! Or “Oh, it’s like us!” – noting the irony sown in the monstrous and the technologically fantastic.

Canticle is indeed entertaining. It can even be premonitory. Clearly “La Simplification” could be likened to the attack on the Capitol last January. The novel, in part, also aligns with my deepest intellectual engagements. I am basically a booklegger myself. I like the project carried by the Albertian Order of Leibowitz: “to save a small vestige of human culture from the rest of humanity that wanted it destroyed”.

Canticle is indeed entertaining. It can even be premonitory. The novel, in part, also aligns with my deepest intellectual engagements.

I recognize the great value Miller places on tedious, hidden intellectual labor – and labor that seems quite unnecessary. I recognize the value of Elder Fingo’s intricate work in sculpting an image of Leibowitz, as well as the notion of shifting artistic taste and the varying whims of those who hold religious authority. I recognize the pain that comes from realizing that after a lot of intellectual work and arguments, we are in fact wrong. I recognize that the humility that comes from realizing that an idea that one has laboriously nurtured is only a rediscovery of the idea of ​​another.

I also recognize the danger of infusing too much meaning into an ancient text or inscription without knowing its immediate or wider historical context. I recognize that science detached from any religious thought or commitment can be utterly destructive. I recognize all these things in Canticle, but I don’t get attached to it as I am with a more realistic novel.

But that’s just me – my taste – and I align myself with the ever-lasting wisp poet and pathos that is Benjamin. Please tell me the opposite: what are you caught up in reading this book?

Two encounters within the novel grabbed me. If you haven’t read the whole novel, beware: reading this paragraph could spoil the suspense of one of the book’s last encounters. Towards the end of “Fiat Voluntas Tua”, Father Zerchi tries to prevent a woman and her child from assisted suicide. Both were badly burned and poisoned by radioactive fallout. The mother’s hip is also broken. As the mother ultimately chooses to hobble to a suicide tent at the height of nuclear war, Zerchi orders her to reject suicide as a choice to end the suffering. The exchange takes place as follows:

[Zerchi] “Are you in pain, my daughter?”
She looked at him coldly. “Do you think that would please God?”
“If you offer it, yes.”
“I cannot understand a God who rejoices in the suffering of my baby! “

The priest winced. “No no! It is not pain that pleases God, my child. It is the endurance of the soul in faith, hope and love despite bodily afflictions that please Heaven. Pain is like a negative temptation. God does not like temptations which afflict the flesh; He is happy when the soul rises above temptation and says, “Go, Satan. It’s the same with pain, which is often a temptation to despair, anger, loss of faith …

“Keep your breath, Father. I am not complaining. The baby is. But the baby doesn’t understand your sermon. It can hurt, however. She can hurt, but she can’t understand.

Tear. One of Miller’s talents, I think, is to enable the three abbots to take on the characteristics of their historical epoch. Father Arkos is sullen and brutal. Paulo is a thoughtful contemplative who is perhaps too permissive, and Father Zerchi is political, stepping out of the abbey (in a driverless car) and fitting directly into the lives of others, even hitting a public official in the face. Although gripping, the above exchange ends with the same recourse to violence that was expected at the time of Father Arkos. Father Zerchi’s last resort is the power of his own command rooted in his office. At least we learn the following from a more practical Abbot Arkos in “Fiat Homo”:

As long as thought could be governed at all, it could only be commanded to follow what reason claimed anyway; order him otherwise, and he would not obey. Like any other wise ruler, Father Arkos did not give orders in vain, when disobeying was possible and enforcing was not possible.

Yet Miller takes us to the heart of the problem of the suffering and truth of a good and omnipotent God. Here Miller and his science fiction got me.

In A hymn for Leibowitz, Miller takes us to the heart of the problem of the suffering and truth of a good and omnipotent God.

The other meeting that attracted me took place between Father Paulo and Thon Taddeo, a figure à la Descartes who considers religion as the great obstacle to scientific progress. There is an almost antiphonic dispute between the two over the relationship between science and religion. Father Paulo contradicts the claims of the tuna by citing Genesis. Finally, Father Paulo offers the following conclusion:

Abusing the intellect for reasons of pride, vanity or evasion of responsibility is the fruit of this same tree… I am not accusing you of anything. But ask yourself the question: why do you rejoice in jumping to such a crazy guess from such a fragile springboard? Why want to discredit the past, or even dehumanize the last civilization? So that you don’t need to learn from their mistakes? Or could it be that you just can’t stand being just a “rediscoverer” and you also have to feel that you are a “creator”?

Not bad, Dom Paulo. Overbreadth in the Garden of Eden was to acquire knowledge without the work and boredom of learning – a distortion of good human beings incarnate.

Overbreadth in the Garden of Eden was to acquire knowledge without the work and boredom of learning – a distortion of good human beings incarnate.

But I still need to convince that A hymn for Leibowitz is, in fact, a great novel. It is Catholic, indeed. It’s a classic – indeed, it’s still in print 62 years after it was first published. So tell me, members of the Catholic Book Club: Why?

Another observation: I leave you with two accounts of the first light — the electric light being on. Those who experience it in each novel are amazed. The first is from Canticle and the second of our last selection of the Catholic Book Club, This is happiness.

Miller:

The monk at the foot of the stairs bowed in gratitude and deprecation. The blue-white glare cast sharp shadows across the room, and the candle flames became hazy scrolls in the tide of light.

“Luminous like a thousand torches”, breathed [Thon Thaddeo]. “It must be an accident, but no! Unthinkable!”

Williams:

I am aware here that it can be difficult to imagine the enormity of this moment [the electrification of rural Ireland], the threshold that once crossed would leave behind a world that had lasted for centuries, and that moment was only sixty years ago. Consider this: When the electricity finally came in, it was discovered that the 100 watt bulb was too bright for Faha. The instant scream was too shocking. Dust and cobwebs have been found to thicken on all surfaces since the 16th century. The reality was appalling. Siney Dunne’s beautiful hair turned out to be a wig, not even close to the skin of the skin on her neck, Mick King was an outright cheater at Forty-Five, and the healthy look of Marian McGlynn. was in fact a hardened makeup the color of red grass ash. Within a week of powering up, Tom Clohessy couldn’t keep any mirrors in stock, had a run in hand, oval, round, and even full-length as people came from the county and bought glasses of all kinds. , returned home, and in ruthless enlightenment endured the punishment of all flesh when they saw what they looked like for the first time.

Give me Williams any day.

Questions for discussion

  1. I first ask what I have posed throughout my introduction: what is attractive about science fiction? What is it about this novel that makes it more than entertaining? What makes it meaningful? Why read science fiction?
  2. Jim Keane shared two thoughtful reviews of Canticle from the 1960s, although at two very different points during the decade. Both are written by thoughtful Jesuits – Norrie Clarke and Ray Schroth. There is another review or sketch of the novel from October 22, 2014 by New Yorker contributor Jon Michaud. I was surprised by several of his opinions on Canticle, in particular his rejection of “Fiat Lux” as a filler between two exciting parts of the novel. I found this to be the most endearing part of the novel.
  3. I was also surprised that Michaud identified Ms. Grales as one of the few significant female presences in the novel. Eve is everywhere in the novel. There’s also Rachel, who is an odd part of Ms. Grales but important to her. Additionally, there is the mother I identify above. It is very important. There are also women whose memories influence history. Emily, who was Leibowitz’s wife before the initial nuclear war, figures in Leibowitz’s canonization, and Joshua’s wife is still a part of him in the final third of the novel. Finally, there is the cynically labeled “Lady Reporter” and portrayed in “Fiat Voluntas Tua”. Indeed, as Michaud deplores, there is no intimacy in this novel, and the women are mostly absent. Yet how do women, in fact, enrich this novel?
  4. How is history or memory a stay against self-destruction? If the Albertian Order of Leibowitz is an “organ of memory” (when Google is really just a collecting body), what good is the preservation of memory if there is no organ or instrument to interpret it critically or to sift it to make sense of it?

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Persecution based on religious belief is unacceptable, says Pope https://aaimaustin.org/persecution-based-on-religious-belief-is-unacceptable-says-pope/ https://aaimaustin.org/persecution-based-on-religious-belief-is-unacceptable-says-pope/#respond Wed, 24 Jan 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/persecution-based-on-religious-belief-is-unacceptable-says-pope/ [ad_1] Vatican City – Everyone has the right to freely profess their own religious beliefs without fear of coercion, Pope Francis said, calling on the world community to do more to protect the Yazidi minority. “It is unacceptable that human beings are persecuted and killed because of their religion,” he told a group of Yazidis […]]]>


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Vatican City – Everyone has the right to freely profess their own religious beliefs without fear of coercion, Pope Francis said, calling on the world community to do more to protect the Yazidi minority.

“It is unacceptable that human beings are persecuted and killed because of their religion,” he told a group of Yazidis during a private audience at the Vatican on January 24.

The Yazidis are a monotheistic religious minority, indigenous to the regions of Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey. They were particularly persecuted by Islamic State activists, who, like Christians, forced them to convert or to be killed.

He told the representatives, who were now living in Germany, that his meeting with them was also a sign of his solidarity and concern for all Yazidis, especially those in Iraq and Syria.

His thoughts and prayers went to all “innocent victims of senseless and inhuman barbarism”, stressing that everyone has the right “to freely and unconstrained profess their own religious belief”.

The Pope said the rich spiritual and cultural history of the Yazidis has been marked by “indescribable violations of basic human rights: kidnappings, slavery, torture, forced conversions and murders”.

“Your shrines and places of prayer were destroyed,” he said, and those who were lucky enough to have been able to flee had to leave so much behind them, including what they considered most. holy and dearest.

Aware of this tragedy, “the international community cannot remain a silent and inert spectator”.

He encouraged organizations and “people of good will” to help rebuild destroyed homes and places of worship and to seek concrete ways to create conditions conducive to the return of people to their countries of origin.

He also said he hoped everything would be done to help rescue those still in the hands of terrorists, locate those still missing, and properly identify and bury those who were murdered.

All over the world, he said, there are religious and ethnic minorities – including Christians – who are persecuted for their faith.

“The Holy See will never tire of intervening by denouncing these situations, by calling for the recognition, protection and respect” of minorities as well as by calling for dialogue and reconciliation, he declared. .

“Once again I speak in favor of the rights of the Yazidis, especially their right to exist as a religious community. ,'” he said.

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