religious fundamentalism – Aaim Austin http://aaimaustin.org/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 18:48:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://aaimaustin.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-5-120x120.png religious fundamentalism – Aaim Austin http://aaimaustin.org/ 32 32 The impact on women in Palestine, Afghanistan and Rojava – Medya News https://aaimaustin.org/the-impact-on-women-in-palestine-afghanistan-and-rojava-medya-news/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 09:48:54 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/the-impact-on-women-in-palestine-afghanistan-and-rojava-medya-news/ The largest annual gathering of feminists in the UK organized by FiLiA, an event regularly attended by 1000-1200 women, is a good entry point into issues of concern to British feminists. But what is atypical for British feminism, it has a strong internationalist perspective. At the conference, held recently in Portsmouth, I moderated a session […]]]>

The largest annual gathering of feminists in the UK organized by FiLiA, an event regularly attended by 1000-1200 women, is a good entry point into issues of concern to British feminists. But what is atypical for British feminism, it has a strong internationalist perspective. At the conference, held recently in Portsmouth, I moderated a session where women from Afghanistan, Palestine and Rojava came together to discuss how occupation and fundamentalism clerics crossed paths to weaken their fight for rights.

I posed a number of provocations. The first being: can occupation ever be a force for good? After all, this is how the media has portrayed the US occupation in Afghanistan, especially on the issue of women’s rights. A new generation of women had been educated who would be much fiercer in their opposition to the Taliban this time around. Nelufer Hadayat, a British Afghan journalist writing in the Guardian, said: “It is true that, on the whole, the occupation of Afghanistan since 2001 was a good thing. Kind of. There were pockets of progress. I have seen it myself in my years of reporting and visiting, and listening to the stories of all my family who still live there. She cites statistics on increasing literacy rates for boys and girls and improving life expectancy rates. But it also refers to the poverty and terrorist attacks that continued under US occupation and took the lives of thousands of Afghans.

Selay Ghaffar, spokesperson for the Afghan Solidarity Party who joined us via Zoom, said emphatically that “they [the US] “educated” a small group of Afghan women who were not “prepared to fight for their rights” but to get along and associate with misogynists and depraved criminals, the mafia and corrupt politicians. She firmly believed that these women were primarily interested in “the money and resources they earned from parliament, ministerial posts and travels abroad”. In fact, these American adopted women and daughters stabbed Afghan women from behind, undermining the struggle of Afghan women for their rights.

Ghaffar argued that Islamic fundamentalism in Afghanistan was promoted by the United States to prevent progressive forces from gaining ground. This is precisely what happened in Israel where Hamas was nurtured in order to weaken the once secular and more progressive forces of Fatah. Why do occupying powers destroy democratic, pro-women and progressive forces in the occupied territory and promote reactionary forces like the Taliban or Hamas? Why are they more afraid of democratic opposition, especially when so many of these invasions are carried out under the guise of democratic nation building? In any case, if the United States does not have real democracy at home, how can it build it elsewhere?

This led me to the following provocation: does it make things better for the occupied if the occupying force claims to be committed to the values ​​of democracy or equality? Israel claims to be the only democracy in the Middle East – and yet it continues to destroy the lives of Palestinians under occupation who have neither vote nor voice. What kind of democratic values ​​can exist in an apartheid state where Palestinians are second-class citizens?

Zeinab Al-Ghonaimi, a legal researcher and women’s rights activist in Gaza, who also joined us via Zoom, explained how women’s rights have been shredded by the pincer movement of the twin forces of Hamas and the Israeli occupation . She argued that “women were the main victims of this ideological shift” under Hamas where the lack of political pluralism has aggravated the deterioration of humanitarian conditions caused by the occupation.

While Zeinab was very clear that Hamas and the Israeli occupation should be resisted at the same time, some Palestinian feminists are in conflict as I have explained elsewhere. They see Fatah as corrupt lackeys of the Israeli state and Hamas as the only true representatives of the national struggle, so they are willing to put aside their discomfort with Hamas’ anti-woman and religious fundamentalist agenda. Zeinab observed that feminists, deprived of any place at the table, had to “push for minor changes to separate texts of the Penal Code and the Personal Status Law”.

In contrast, the women of Rojava (AANES, the Autonomous Administration of North and East Syria) gained unprecedented power which they used to achieve equality, introducing some of the laws most favorable to women in the world and by banishing religion from the public. sphere. However, the rights acquired by this revolutionary and popular democracy have been reversed in those regions, such as Afrin, which have been invaded and occupied by Turkey under the dictatorship of a misogynist and Islamist regime, as pointed out by Rohash Shexo, representing British member of Kongra Star, the umbrella organization for women in Rojava.

In fact, Rojava needed the United States to remain as a bulwark against their own dictator, Assad, Erdogan of Turkey and ISIS against whom the fight is not yet over. If the US-led coalition had not provided air cover during the famous Battle of Kobane in 2014, Kurdish resistance to ISIS might have crumbled. And we may not have had a feminist revolution to inspire us.

The United States was not an “occupying” power. Their intervention was absolutely necessary to enable the people of Rojava to win the battle against Daesh. Why didn’t the United States stay and become an occupying power? Given the widespread use of “democracy” as cover for its invasions around the world, it would have made sense for the United States to stay behind to protect this fragile democracy. Or is real democracy just too threatening for the United States?

One could argue that the US occupation continues through the back door through its proxy, Turkey, which is a NATO ally. Former Islamic State fighters joined the Turkish army as mercenaries and invaded parts of Rojava with impunity, in part because the United States looked the other way.

Was the American intervention in Rojava an example of the doctrine of liberal interventionism as adopted by Tony Blair who used it to justify the Western invasion of Iraq, Kosovo and Sierra Leone? Iraq, in fact, has turned into an occupation. Does occupation differ from liberal interventionism only in duration, when the country’s resources end up being exploited by the invading power?

For Tony Blair, staying until the job was done successfully was a key part of his strategy. In his famous speech on liberal interventionism, he asked, “Are we ready for the long term? In the past, we talked too much about exit strategies. But having made a commitment, we cannot simply walk away when the fight is over; better to stay with a moderate number of troops than to return for repeated performances with a large number.

And yet, this strategy has failed in Afghanistan.

How do we understand the interventionism of the United States in Rojava which had a positive impact in prolonging the revolutionary struggle? Many on the anti-imperialist left, in their instinctive hatred of the United States, also refused to support the revolution because it was seen to have gotten its hands dirty working with the United States.

All of these conflicting positions compete for women’s bodies and minds. For religious fundamentalists, the control of women is central to their project. For the liberal democratic forces of the world, the liberation of women is a vaunted part of their project. And yet, these same forces sell us again and again by encouraging (at worst) or ignoring (at best) the growth of religious fundamentalism.

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Yash Chopra tackled partition and Hindu fundamentalism in Dharmputra, long before Garm Hava https://aaimaustin.org/yash-chopra-tackled-partition-and-hindu-fundamentalism-in-dharmputra-long-before-garm-hava/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 05:50:19 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/yash-chopra-tackled-partition-and-hindu-fundamentalism-in-dharmputra-long-before-garm-hava/ VVery few Indian filmmakers attempted to make a film about the country’s partition in 1947. BR Chopra and Yash Chopra took that risk with their film Dharmputra — the first Hindi film about the partition — in 1961, when the wounds were still fresh. Yash Chopra, who had only one film and was still in […]]]>

VVery few Indian filmmakers attempted to make a film about the country’s partition in 1947. BR Chopra and Yash Chopra took that risk with their film Dharmputra — the first Hindi film about the partition — in 1961, when the wounds were still fresh. Yash Chopra, who had only one film and was still in his late twenties, tackled with sensitivity and boldness the subject of Hindu-Muslim unity, communal harmony and Hindu fundamentalism.

On this Republic Day, when we will once again celebrate the spirit of India’s Constitution – a great equalizer – thisit’s just to revisit such movies which emphasized the spirit of India, its composite culture and peaceful coexistence (for the most part).

Dharmputra marked the debut of young Shashi Kapoor, who went on to establish himself as one of Hindi cinema’s most charming romantic heroes. Yash Chopra, the director, has also become the king of romance. Interestingly, their first collaboration had little romance but a strong social message. Dharmputra also stars Mala Sinha, Ashok Kumar, Rajendra Kumar and Nirupa Roy. The film deals with the period 1925-1947, the pre-partition era, and takes a close look at changing political scenarios and their effects on families.

Nawab Badruddin (Ashok Kumar) is a friend of Dr. Amrit Rai (Manmohan Krishna). He is troubled because his unmarried daughter Husn Bano (Mala Sinha) is pregnant with her lover’s child. Family friends Dr. Rai and his wife Savitri (Nirupa Roy) adopt the baby. Bano’s father eventually agrees to marry her off to her lover Javed (Rehman), whom he had previously rejected because he was of a “lower” caste. This is remarkable because very few films in Indian cinema have dealt with the caste hierarchy present in Muslim communities.

Nawab, a great defender of Hindu-Muslim unity, dies during the civil disobedience movement with the slogan “Hindu-Muslim bhai bhai” on his lips. Savitri gives birth to two more children but Bano is unable to have children due to an accident. Bano’s son, Dileep, who was adopted by the Rai family, is unaware of his identity and calls him Bano too (aunt).

The two families live peacefully and even build a bridge to connect their houses so that Dileep can visit his “aunt” whenever he wishes.

The story moves forward and Javed and Bano soon leave India for Europe and return before partition in 1947, a time when religious fundamentalism and Hindu-Muslim animosity were on the rise. Dileep (Shashi Kapoor) is a handsome young adult man who has become a bigoted and religious fundamentalist. He’s your prototype Bajrang Dal who doesn’t like the fact that people of his generation wear Western clothes, disrespect Sanskriti and don’t play games.puja-way‘. The rest of the film tells how the two families go through the pre-Partition period and how Dileep comes to terms with his religious bigotry.


Read also : MS Sathyu’s Garm Hava still speaks to a country struggling with citizenship questions


Subtle references to fundamentalism

In a 1984 interview, Yash Chopra said, “I saw massacres with my own eyes and lived through the frenzy, madness and madness of the time. What I saw then, I used in Dharmaputra, but I didn’t make the movie because of what I saw. When I read the novel [by Acharya Chatursen], something of this experience must have prompted me to make the film.

Perhaps their real-life experiences managing the score helped them bring more depth and nuance to the film. Shashi Kapoor’s character stands out as the Hindu fundamentalist who believes in “Hindi, Hindu and Hindustan” and hates Muslims. But he is forced to reassess his beliefs when he finds out he was born to Muslim parents. In one of the scenes, which was meant to be romantic, Yash Chopra couldn’t resist bringing Dileep’s true character element. On a walk with Dileep’s love interest, the woman says, “Aaj ka mausam bahut accha hai (today the weather is really nice).

Dileep responds:Hamare desh ka mausam toh hamesha hi accha hota hai, you baat to videshi log kahte hain (The climate of our country is always pleasant, only foreigners say so).

It shows how love for his country seeped into his subconscious to make him a fundamentalist. But this love is dangerous, as revealed in one of the later scenes, when Dileep gets angry at his brother and yells at him, “if you say anything against religion, I’ll kill you”.

Dharm putra is full of references and songs illustrating the cultural and religious harmony of India. Sahir Ludhianvi’s qawwali in the film “Ye Masjid hai woh Butkhana, chahe ye maano chahe woh maano (it’s the mosque, and it’s the temple, you can believe either one)”, is a fitting tribute to the secular character of India. Amrit Rai, in one of his dialogues towards the end, compares the demon of religious fundamentalism to mythological demons like Ravana, Duryodhana, etc.

Making a film about Hindu religious fundamentalism would be nearly impossible today. It probably wouldn’t even pass Censor Board checks, or lead to nationwide protests, which also happened when Dharm putra was released in 1961. The film failed to achieve commercial success due to violent protests in cinemas, but won the National Award for Best Hindi Feature Film. It was not until 1973 that MS Sathyu tackled the sensitive subject of Partition in his film Garm Hava.

(Edited by Prashant)

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Seeds of hatred are a consequence of fundamentalism https://aaimaustin.org/seeds-of-hatred-are-a-consequence-of-fundamentalism/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 19:30:30 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/seeds-of-hatred-are-a-consequence-of-fundamentalism/ [ad_1] Malta’s Equality Minister has warned of the dangers of religious fundamentalism as the country reels over outrageous comments made following the brutal murder of Polish national Paulina Dembska. “It’s easy to say whatever you want, but the consequences are there,” Owen Bonnici said on yesterday’s Pjazza show on ONE. “And the consequences of fundamentalism […]]]>


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Malta’s Equality Minister has warned of the dangers of religious fundamentalism as the country reels over outrageous comments made following the brutal murder of Polish national Paulina Dembska.

“It’s easy to say whatever you want, but the consequences are there,” Owen Bonnici said on yesterday’s Pjazza show on ONE.

“And the consequences of fundamentalism are the seeds of hatred, and what this priest said is serious. There is a line that cannot be crossed, a line of hate speech, that is unacceptable – and that line has been crossed. “

“I urge the authorities to take action on this and make the decision they need to take. “

Since Bonnici’s public call, a number of other politicians, including Minister of Inclusion Julia Farrugia Portelli, have urged Police Commissioner Angelo Gafa to investigate the public statements of Tory priest Father David Muscat.

Since yesterday, Muscat has been called to the police depot as police investigate him, and he has received a formal warning from the Archbishop of Malta who may prohibit him from performing his ministry in public in the future.

“The purpose of his remarks was to incite a kind of negative feeling towards a minority in this country,” Bonnici said. ” This is unacceptable. There is no place for it in our society. These words crossed the line.

Pjazza host Karl Stagna Navarra added that the comment was one of the biggest atrocities he had heard of in this country.

You can watch the full interview on Pjazza below:

What do you think of Muscat’s backlash to fundamentalist rhetoric?

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Morrison’s religious fundamentalism drives democracy https://aaimaustin.org/morrisons-religious-fundamentalism-drives-democracy/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 04:00:26 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/morrisons-religious-fundamentalism-drives-democracy/ [ad_1] Scott Morrison’s religious fundamentalism is a potential danger to democracy, because this alarming situationMay article, which has received more than 19,000 views, proves it. ***** Electing candidates from churches like Scott Morrison’s Pentecostal Church and packing them into parliament is detrimental to a viable democracy, writes Brian morris. WITH THE rise of Pentecostal and […]]]>


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Scott Morrison’s religious fundamentalism is a potential danger to democracy, because this alarming situationMay article, which has received more than 19,000 views, proves it.

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Electing candidates from churches like Scott Morrison’s Pentecostal Church and packing them into parliament is detrimental to a viable democracy, writes Brian morris.

WITH THE rise of Pentecostal and charismatic mega-churches, there is a rational concern that a “literal” belief in the Bible has led to anti-science trolls, denial of climate change, and an anti-vax movement. But the end of the game will be more serious if the trend continues to transform into an American style of Christian domination.

Most people will roll their eyes when overzealous Christians say their life’s mission is to convert us all to become “disciples of Christ.” But it is more difficult to tolerate those who firmly believe that all positions of power and authority – in government, justice, media and business – can only be held by those who are spiritually attached to religion. “Literal truth” of the Christian Bible. Including Genesis and all of the Old Testament.

Biblical literalism underlies the growing belief in creationism – that God created everything – and it is this belief that motivates Dominionism; that only Christians can rule a nation. Australasian Sciences in 2011, 31% of Australians believed in creationism. With the rise of evangelism since 2011, the figure is likely to be much higher.

It is the basis of Dominionism, an American export of the 1990s that spawned the American Tea Party movement in 2010 and the same Christian conservatives who elected Donald Trump in 2016. The Republican Party is now fully enmeshed in the theology of the dominion which is exported. in many countries, including Australia.

As early as 2005, Marion Maddox, professor of politics at Macquarie University – and Christian of the United Church – published “God Under Howard: The Rise of the Religious Right in Australia”. It signals the rise of Dominionism here.

Genesis is God’s rulebook for biblical literalists. They take literally what God said to “subdue the earth” and “rule over it”. The influx of evangelism to the United States includes Hillsong and a plethora of Pentecostals churches such as Horizon Church in Sutherland NSW, whose congregation includes Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his family. Pastor Hillsong Brian Houston is also Scott Morrison’s mentor and the Prime Minister heads a recognized Christian government.

Democracy is receding around the world – a trend over the past 13 years, according to House of Liberty, that oversees the rise of authoritarian governments.

Psychology professor Paul Wink of the College of Liberal Arts at the University of New Hampshire, Dean Michele Dillon and associate professor of philosophy at Bryn Mawr College Adrienne Prettyman write that far-right authoritarianism:

‘…is positively associated with conventional, unchallenged and thoughtless religion.

It is Christian dominionism.

Their ultimate goal is to gain control – or at least to have influence – over the “7 Mountains” of any society. The “mountains” are education, media, government, churches, business, family, and the arts. Christians who work in these areas are required to fulfill the mandate of the Seven Mountains – to take control and carry out God’s plan.

It is anything but a conspiracy to reflect on the growing influence of these fundamentalist religious brands over the past 30 years. Islamic extremism is making international headlines with its ruthless aggression, but Christian evangelism (turning into Dominionism) is increasing its political influence by going under the media radar.

The bizarre aspect of fundamentalism lies in its anti-science foundations. Human evolution is considered a hoax, and Earth is 6,000 years old – based on the presumed lifespan of Biblical figures since Adam and Eve. Australian Christian fundamentalist Ken Ham built a giant Noah’s Ark in Kentucky, featuring life-size displays of humans living with dinosaurs.

In Australia, evangelical Christians are being prepared by a multitude of religious lobbies to run for office in federal, state and local governments, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. America is the most Christianized nation on Earth; Australia isn’t far behind – with one of the highest ratios of fundamentalist MPs in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

This is not surprising considering the recruitment drives of the religious right, as seen in February during the Church-State Crusade – its annual Australian summit – to “arm the Christians for the Kingdom to Come ”. Once again, pure Dominionism. The goal of fundamentalist churches is to roll back secular politics to make voluntary abortion and assisted death illegal, and to ban LGBT + people from working in church businesses.

The public is largely oblivious to all of this and there is no mainstream media analysis of right-wing Christian programs. But many “moderate” Christians are concerned with the undemocratic goals of fundamentalist Christianity.

Baptist Church minister Reverend Dr Craig de Vos said groups like the Australian Christian Lobby (ACL) are pursuing a program “straight out of the Dominionist theology playbook”. In 2011, the ABC published an article titled, “Is the Australian Christian lobby Dominionist?” “- when ACL was then linked to the 7 Montagnes website.

The Reverend de Vos said in one of his sermons at the Baptist Church of North Adelaide:

“The religious right of this country wants to take control of the government either by a stealthy insurgency … or by more aggressive means because it feels despised, even persecuted, because all of us ungodly pagans do not share their anti-science and their conspiracy. charged ideas, selective biblical literalism, Taliban-like morality and prehistoric values.

Dominion ethics are no different from Islamic theocracies that impose Sharia law – countries like Syria, Libya, Egypt, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Algeria, to name a few. -a. The only Christian theocracy is Vatican City, which is an exclusive Catholic state, but fundamentalists want a return to the Christian-controlled states of the Middle Ages.

Dominionism is unlikely to win, at least in the short term. But Australia is already a “soft theocracy,” with heavily Christianized governments at all three levels. And this despite 78% of citizens who wish to “separate personal religious beliefs from the business of government.” Members of Parliament have a much higher religious ratio than the public.

Religion retains control of Australian politics in a

The question is whether we want Australia to become more and more secular. It means working to elect federal, state and local governments that take a strong stand on the future of the nation and advance a progressive secular worldview. Or, if we just don’t care, the public can nod to fundamentalist Christian groups actively recruiting young Pentecostals, Creationists, and Evangelicals to establish a Christian theocracy.

The world is in crisis with the coronavirus pandemic and the rise of fundamentalisms. According to Demo Finland – the Finnish democracy watchdog – nearly 70% of the world’s population now live in undemocratic states. Or an increase of 20% only in the last ten years.

We must again stress that authoritarianism is underpinned by religion. Australians must decide whether they prefer a progressive secular future or a continuation of our trend to elect fundamentalist MPs and further Christianize our three levels of government.

The leaders of the National Liberal Party (LNP) and the Australian Labor Party (ALP) both remain fixated on the idea of ​​yielding to the illusory ‘Christian vote’. This alone perpetuates our status as a “soft theocracy”.

But taking political candidates from Pentecostal and Evangelical churches and packing more Christians into parliament puts a distinct pressure on a viable democracy.

Religious freedom is indeed a civil right for all, including the true public majority which does not practice a particular religion. and who do not want any form of religion imposed on them. The problem with overzealous people of faith is that they claim spiritual superiority. to “know the plan of God.” Oh good? How? ‘Or’ What?

We must prevent religion from becoming a weapon to assert Christian Dominionism – with the ultimate goal of killing democracy and enthroning Jesus.

Brian morris is a former journalist and founder of the National Secular Lobby (NSL) and Plain Reason.

Prime Minister Morrison and the Pentecostal agenda

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Saudi Tabligh ban shows ‘apolitical’ fundamentalism is still fundamentalism https://aaimaustin.org/saudi-tabligh-ban-shows-apolitical-fundamentalism-is-still-fundamentalism/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 06:53:39 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/saudi-tabligh-ban-shows-apolitical-fundamentalism-is-still-fundamentalism/ [ad_1] The Saudi ban on Tablighi Jamaat, on the grounds that it misleads Muslims and opens “the doors to terrorism, even if they claim to the contrary”, is interesting. It’s like the pot calling the black kettle. Saudi Arabia is home to Wahhabi / Salafi Islam, the strictest and most fundamentalist form of Islam, while […]]]>


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The Saudi ban on Tablighi Jamaat, on the grounds that it misleads Muslims and opens “the doors to terrorism, even if they claim to the contrary”, is interesting. It’s like the pot calling the black kettle. Saudi Arabia is home to Wahhabi / Salafi Islam, the strictest and most fundamentalist form of Islam, while the Tabligh is a movement to tell Muslims to stick to the purity of their religion. faith, including its five fundamental pillars – chahada, declaration of faith, salah (pray), zakat (charity), saw (fasting during Ramzan), and Haj (the pilgrimage to Mecca).

While the Tabligh claims to be apolitical, the point is that Islam is more political than most other religions. The prophet certainly made no effort to separate his religious identity as the founder of the faith from his political and military management of the new community. The Prophet largely failed as a preacher in Mecca, but that changed once he filled his preaching with political and military foundations in Medina. Thus, any organization that claims to be apolitical cannot escape the reality that those who follow the fundamentals, and in particular accept the life and actions of the Prophet as guiding principles, ultimately cannot remain apolitical.

The Deoband Seminary and Tablighi Jamaat in India have strongly denied the Saudi Tabligh’s link to terrorism, but the point is that fundamentalisms of any kind, even peaceful, cannot ultimately lead to peace.

Let’s start with the five pillars of Islam that the Tabligh emphasizes. The first pillar, the chahada, is simple and straightforward. He says that “There is no God but God and Muhammad is his prophet.” This statement is absolutist, and not just about those who believe in Islam. This implies that those who do not believe, or who only partially believe, cannot be Muslims. This was the problem the pre-Islamic tribal religions of Mecca had with the Prophet’s version of the new faith. Allah existed before the Prophet, but once the Prophet entered the scene, all previous religions had to disappear. When the Prophet returned triumphantly from Medina to Mecca, he had all the ancient idols and forms of faith destroyed. the chahada (belief in a specific god) is not problematic when it is an individual who believes in it; it becomes problematic when it becomes a group belief and no deviation is possible. He ultimately opposes one community to another, the mom (true believer) against the kafir. And in the Koran, the kafir is not just a non-believer (as we have polished and nastics in dharmic systems), but someone whose destruction Allah himself will seek.

The second pillar, prayer, is unquestionable as long as it concerns the individual in private spaces. But the requirement of prayer sometimes becomes an imposition on others in mixed societies, when calls to prayer (azaan) echo through loudspeakers and the Friday requirement for congregational worship involves taking over public spaces for the religious needs of a community. No one would have a problem with the second pillar if it was practiced in private spaces (houses, mosques, etc.), but this pillar is erected right in the middle of a public space. Even airports are now looking to create places for namaz.

Likewise, the third pillar – charity – is a laudable goal, but only if it is to help the poor. Once zakat is used to preach and proselytize, it is no longer a question of practicing one’s faith. These are predatory conceptions of the beliefs of others.

The two pillars that no one can have a problem with are fasting and Haj. These pillars do not impact anyone outside of the real Muslim world and therefore are not of concern in a multi-religious society. It is the first three pillars, where faith intersects with public life, that pose a problem.

However, the Tabligh is not limited to educating Muslims on the Five Pillars. It is also a missionary movement, which can include conversions. He believes in the suppression of syncretic practices among Muslims practicing their faith in mixed societies. The effort to eliminate “shirk” and “kufr” involves making the faith a Puritan religion, which ultimately leads to extremism and separation from the larger society in which the faith operates.

The simple truth is that there is no such thing as a pure faith (or a race or ethnicity, for that matter). All ideas and all peoples have mingled and borrowed and lent their practices from one another. Trying to suppress syncretic practices is therefore an extreme form of exclusivity which can ultimately only lead to social conflicts. Because it converts a simple difference between two communities into an insurmountable ditch which effectively opposes the others. Terrorism is one of the possible consequences of desycretization and exclusivity.

The Saudi ban on Tabligh is hypocritical because it is not much different from the Wahhabism it has funded for half a century, but it highlights the problems we face with religious fundamentalism. Peaceful fundamentalism does not exist.

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Ecumenical Patriarch rejects religious fundamentalism and outright nationalism https://aaimaustin.org/ecumenical-patriarch-rejects-religious-fundamentalism-and-outright-nationalism/ https://aaimaustin.org/ecumenical-patriarch-rejects-religious-fundamentalism-and-outright-nationalism/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 22:48:39 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/ecumenical-patriarch-rejects-religious-fundamentalism-and-outright-nationalism/ [ad_1] “No to religious fundamentalism and absolute nationalism,” Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew said at the International Meeting of Religions and Cultures in Rome. Yesterday at the end of the afternoon, the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew spoke at the international meeting organized in Rome by the Catholic community of Saint Aegidos, the “Brother peoples, the land of the […]]]>


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“No to religious fundamentalism and absolute nationalism,” Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew said at the International Meeting of Religions and Cultures in Rome.

Yesterday at the end of the afternoon, the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew spoke at the international meeting organized in Rome by the Catholic community of Saint Aegidos, the “Brother peoples, the land of the future. Religions and cultures in dialogue.

The Primate of Christian Orthodoxy, among others, emphasized:

“Can we go back to the previous period, as if nothing had happened? Our answer to this question is only one: the old world no longer exists and we have in our hands the capacity to build a new beginning, a departure that can only be done together.

The Ecumenical Patriarch addressed believers, economists, philosophers, environmentalists, scientists, men and women of good will and highlighted three main principles for the future.

“We begin by re-stating what the pandemic has made clearer: that we belong to one human family, from all the peoples of the earth, with a need to pay attention to Creation. It is therefore necessary that we all recognize, at all levels, not only human rights, but that we belong to a single humanity, with all its peculiarities, cultures and identities. A new start in the post-pandemic era cannot ignore all of this by eliminating any perception of diversity and helping us to recognize ourselves as one family.

The second principle, according to the Patriarch is to recognize the unique identity of each one and to listen to one another, “not to become one with an international identity, but to understand the uniqueness of the other”.

The last principle emphasized by the Ecumenical Patriarch is mutual respect: “Mutual respect, dialogue and mutual listening make the above possible. By overcoming religious fundamentalism and absolute nationalism. “Proclaiming fair justice at all levels of human society and creating moments of mutual enrichment,” Bartholomew said.

Because “the main goal is for people to live in peace” and “protect God’s creation and everything related to it”. Otherwise, “the consequences will be worse than the world we left behind.”

Today the Patriarch will pray for peace at the Colosseum. An initiative in which Pope Francis will also participate.

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Threat of the rise of fundamentalism for democracy https://aaimaustin.org/threat-of-the-rise-of-fundamentalism-for-democracy/ https://aaimaustin.org/threat-of-the-rise-of-fundamentalism-for-democracy/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 06:56:15 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/threat-of-the-rise-of-fundamentalism-for-democracy/ [ad_1] Fundamentalism is the belief in ancient and traditional forms of religion or the belief that anything written in a holy book is true. This was particularly evident in the 20th century, which seeks to reclaim and publicly institutionalize aspects of the past that modern life has obscured. The 21st century has witnessed a phenomenal […]]]>


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Fundamentalism is the belief in ancient and traditional forms of religion or the belief that anything written in a holy book is true. This was particularly evident in the 20th century, which seeks to reclaim and publicly institutionalize aspects of the past that modern life has obscured.

The 21st century has witnessed a phenomenal rise in fundamentalism and fanaticism and a rise in global terrorism. Fundamentalists view secular states as their main enemy because their goals don’t tend to align with each other.

Representative image. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Socialist society believes in education, democracy, reforms, modernization, liberalization and economic reforms. Fundamentalists see all of these goals as obstacles to their goal of preserving the spiritual dimension of life.

The ideology of fundamentalism has not only gripped poor and underdeveloped countries, but has also hijacked developed, liberal and democratic nations. Many factors such as imperialism, poverty, lack of good governance, corruption, political instability and poor economic conditions have contributed to the rise of fundamentalism.

Lately, the concept of fundamentalism has taken a bad turn with the rise of activism, violence and terrorism. Religious awareness not only among the elderly but also among the young is increasing nowadays. It is the by-product of modern life, which has become synonymous with stress, pressures, competitiveness and uncertainty.

This overt religiosity has led to the growth, spread and strengthening of fundamentalism. However, among the most distinctive features of the current situation are the leaps that are taking place in globalization, linked to a process of capitalist accumulation that is accelerating in a world dominated by the capitalist-imperialist system. This has led to significant and often dramatic changes in the lives of large numbers of people, often undermining traditional relationships and customs.

All over the developing world people are being driven from the farmlands where they lived and tried to survive in oppressive conditions, but they can’t even do it now. They are thrown into the urban areas that surround the heart of cities.

Almost half of the world’s population lives in urban areas, including massive and growing slums. Uprooted from their traditional conditions and the traditional forms in which they have been exploited and oppressed, they are thrown into a very precarious and unstable existence, unable to integrate in any way into the economic and social fabric. and the functioning of society.

In many countries, the majority of people living in urban areas work in the informal economy. To a large extent, because of this, many people are turning to religious fundamentalism to try to give them a foothold in the midst of all this dislocation and upheaval.

In developing countries, these massive changes and upheavals are occurring against a backdrop of domination and exploitation by foreign imperialists, who are associated with the local ruling classes. These classes are economically and politically dependent and subordinate to imperialism and are seen as corrupt agents of a foreign power, who also promote the decadent culture of the West.

Demonstration in Bangladesh
Representative image. (by Abdul goni from Pixabay)

This, in the short term, can strengthen the hands of fundamentalist religious forces and leaders who oppose the corruption and Western decadence of the local ruling classes and imperialists to whom they are indebted, in terms of return and enforcement with revenge, relationships, customs, ideas and traditional values ​​which themselves are rooted in the past embody extreme forms of exploitation and oppression.

Many fundamentalist organizations have been created, and it should be clearly noted, they are limited to Islamic fundamentalism.

Fundamentalism is viral in many religions, including some liberal religions. Fundamentalism in the United States has its roots in the Niagara Bible Conference linked to Christian fundamentalism. Jewish fundamentalism has been used to characterize militant religious Zionism. Likewise, Hindu fundamentalism is noticeable in Hindutva, Ayodhya verdict, Gujrat riots, etc.

The origin of Islamic fundamentalism dates back to the 7th century. The Shia and Sunni religious conflict has also created a rift and worsened Islamic fundamentalism. Boko Haram of Al-Shabaab, Ansar-al-Sharia, ISIS, Al-Qaeda, etc., are Islamic fundamentalist organizations endangering peace and harmony, giving rise to terrorist activities.

The rise of fundamentalism is leading not only to the loss of life and property, but also to the displacement of millions of people from their homelands. The growing terrorist attacks and the migration crisis in Europe are due to the growing fundamentalism in Central and West Asia. Peace, harmony and prosperity have been dominated by fear, apprehension and hatred.

A democratic government that enjoys greater popular participation must be the backbone of good governance. People need to be educated to improve their employability. This leads to an improvement in the standard of living. People need more religious freedom.

There is a need to intensify international cooperation and collaboration in order to stem the rise of fundamentalism. The United Nations has an important role to play in improving the deterioration of the global environment.

Featured Image via pxfuel

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CM Pinarayi condemns rise of religious fundamentalism, says Afghanistan is an example https://aaimaustin.org/cm-pinarayi-condemns-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism-says-afghanistan-is-an-example/ https://aaimaustin.org/cm-pinarayi-condemns-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism-says-afghanistan-is-an-example/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/cm-pinarayi-condemns-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism-says-afghanistan-is-an-example/ [ad_1] Pinarayi Vijayan said the teachings of Sree Narayana Guru were a panacea for the world torn apart by communal and racial conflict. Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday (August 23rd) condemned the rise of religious fundamentalism in Afghanistan. The CM said the powerful stream of humanism that animated Sree Narayana Guru’s teachings was […]]]>


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Pinarayi Vijayan said the teachings of Sree Narayana Guru were a panacea for the world torn apart by communal and racial conflict.

Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday (August 23rd) condemned the rise of religious fundamentalism in Afghanistan. The CM said the powerful stream of humanism that animated Sree Narayana Guru’s teachings was a panacea for the world torn apart by communal and racial conflict. He strongly condemned religious and racist fundamentalism at the inauguration of Sree Narayana Guru’s birth anniversary celebrations by videoconference from CM’s home district, Kannur, on Monday August 23. He said Afghanistan is an example of what would happen to a nation consumed by religious fundamentalism.

Kerala celebrated the 167th birthday of Sree Narayana Guru on Monday. A 19th-century social reformer, Sree Narayana Guru, is also one of the state’s foremost philosophers. The essence of Guru’s philosophy was that humanity and human love stand above religion.

“There haven’t been many times like this before when humanity has been crushed to death by religious, communal and extremist forces. In times like this, which we are going through now, his teachings become all the more relevant. Conflicts based on racism and communal hatred have increased in various parts of the world. The Guru had preached the great message of human love that could help the human race come out of destruction. He preached the religion that “humans are one,” Pinarayi said.

Pinarayi also criticized some of the media for “glorifying” the Taliban. “Some media have tried to glorify the Taliban and it is really deplorable. Everyone knows how they started to grow and who was responsible for their growth. We are going through a period when religious, community and terrorist organizations are trying to crush humanity. and the teachings of Guru are against those who try to stir it up, ”Pinarayi said.

With IANS inputs

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CM condemns the rise of religious fundamentalism https://aaimaustin.org/cm-condemns-the-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism/ https://aaimaustin.org/cm-condemns-the-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 14:38:15 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/cm-condemns-the-rise-of-religious-fundamentalism/ [ad_1] Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said on Monday that the powerful stream of humanism that animated the teachings of 19th-century social reformer Sree Narayana Guru was a panacea for the world torn by communal and racial strife. Inaugurating the Renaissance leader’s birth anniversary celebrations by videoconference from Kannur, Mr. Vijayan took the opportunity to condemn […]]]>


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Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan said on Monday that the powerful stream of humanism that animated the teachings of 19th-century social reformer Sree Narayana Guru was a panacea for the world torn by communal and racial strife.

Inaugurating the Renaissance leader’s birth anniversary celebrations by videoconference from Kannur, Mr. Vijayan took the opportunity to condemn the rise of religious fundamentalism in Afghanistan.

He said Afghanistan was an example of what would happen to a nation consumed by religious fundamentalism. “Fundamentalism is a destructive fire that destroys civilizations and nations,” he said.

Only humanism could extinguish such destructive conflagrations. The Guru’s teachings rooted in compassion, universal peace, human rights and tolerance have provided answers to the woes of the world.

Mr. Vijayan recalled the plight of the oppressed people of Palestine and the ethnic cleansing of Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar. He said communal hatred often appears in India.

“There has never been a time in history when religious fundamentalism has limited the rights of human beings on such a global scale,” he said.

The Guru had emphasized the essential unity of humans regardless of race, culture, caste, creed, religion, gender or skin color. “One caste, one religion, one God for humans” was Sree Narayana Guru’s belief system.

The LDF government had honored the reformer’s credo with progressive action. He had defeated the powerful caste forces in the feudal society of Kerala in the 19th century by spreading reason, education, enlightenment and pacifist thought.

Mr. Vijayan said the reformer recognized caste as a convenient instrument for social and financial oppression. He fought it with an emphasis on Renaissance values. He gathered a social conscience against child marriage, polygamy, animal sacrifice and other social evils of his time.

Mr. Vijayan said the Guru was above castes and religion. His teachings were universal in nature. They have had a beneficial effect on all strata of society. Mr Vijayan said it was historically inaccurate to portray the reformer as the leader of a particular caste. The seer had used religious thought as a tool to emancipate the masses.

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Afghanistan, a lesson in how religious fundamentalism can burn nations: Kerala CM https://aaimaustin.org/afghanistan-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-kerala-cm/ Mon, 23 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://aaimaustin.org/afghanistan-a-lesson-in-how-religious-fundamentalism-can-burn-nations-kerala-cm/ Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity that communal discord in the name of religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations and therefore we must hold humanity above caste and religion, said Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday. Speaking at the virtual inauguration of the 167th birth anniversary of spiritual leader and social reformer Sree […]]]>

Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity that communal discord in the name of religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations and therefore we must hold humanity above caste and religion, said Kerala Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Monday. Speaking at the virtual inauguration of the 167th birth anniversary of spiritual leader and social reformer Sree Narayana Guru, the Chief Minister said in many parts of the world that “racism, bigotry and bloodshed were endemic” and that the situation was extremely serious in Afghanistan, one of India’s neighbours.

In India too, communal hatred has arisen and all of this can be ended by embracing Guru’s message that all human beings should be treated as one and not discriminated against on the basis of caste or religion. “Afghanistan is a lesson for humanity. A lesson in how communal discord due to religious fundamentalism can burn peoples and nations,” Vijayan said in his speech.

He said what was happening in Palestine, in the case of the Rohingya refugees and in Kashmir were examples of divisive religious fundamentalism. “The ultimate cure for such social ills is the guru’s message of unity on behalf of humanity beyond caste and religion,” he added.

Earlier today, in a Facebook post on the occasion of the guru’s 167th birthday, Vijayan said, “It is time to stand united to overcome the challenges posed by communal, political and capitalist ideologies that are undermining the fraternity and equality. may the current crisis be resolved and a new world full of peace and prosperity be established.” He said that the messages of Sree Narayana Guru proclaiming humanity rather than caste and religion should be understood and followed sincerely at the current era “more than ever” for the “improvement” of society.

In his message, Governor of Kerala, Arif Mohammed Khan said, “My humble pranams to #SreeNarayanaGuru on his 167th Jayanti. With our feet firm on the noble principles advocated by this Vishwa Guru, let purity permeate our thoughts, words and deeds. “

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